It’s not over : getting beyond tolerance, defeating homophobia, and winning true equality (EBOOK)

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Michelangelo Signorile

Marriage equality has surged across the country. Closet doors have burst open in business, entertainment, and even major league sports. But as longtime advocate Michelangelo Signorile argues in his most provocative book yet, the excitement of such breathless change makes this moment more dangerous than ever. Puncturing the illusion that victory is now inevitable, Signorile marshals stinging evidence that an age-old hatred, homophobia, is still a basic fact of American life. He exposes the bigotry of the brewing religious conservative backlash against LGBT rights and challenges the complacency and hypocrisy of supposed allies in Washington, the media, and Hollywood.

Not just a wake-up call, It’s Not Over is also a battle plan for the fights to come in the march toward equality. Signorile tells the stories of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans who have refused to be merely tolerated, or worse, and are demanding full acceptance. And he documents signs of hope in schools and communities finding new ways to combat ignorance, bullying, and fear. Urgent and empowering, It’s Not Over is a necessary book from one of our most electrifying voices.

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All-American Flag Act : report of the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, United States Senate, to accompany S. 1214, to require the purchase of domestically made flags of the United States of America for use by the federal government (EBOOK)

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FLAG DAY, June 14, 2016

 

All-American Flag Act : report of the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, United States Senate, to accompany S. 1214, to require the purchase of domestically made flags of the United States of America for use by the federal government.

by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs author.

Washington, D.C. : U.S. Government Printing Office, 2014.

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Violence against queer people : race, class, gender, and the persistence of anti-LGBT discrimination

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by Doug Meyer

Violence against lesbians and gay men has increasingly captured media and scholarly attention. But these reports tend to focus on one segment of the LGBT community—white, middle class men—and largely ignore that part of the community that arguably suffers a larger share of the violence—racial minorities, the poor, and women. In Violence against Queer People, sociologist Doug Meyer offers the first investigation of anti-queer violence that focuses on the role played by race, class, and gender.

Drawing on interviews with forty-seven victims of violence, Meyer shows that LGBT people encounter significantly different forms of violence—and perceive that violence quite differently—based on their race, class, and gender.  His research highlights the extent to which other forms of discrimination—including racism and sexism—shape LGBT people’s experience of abuse. He reports, for instance, that lesbian and transgender women often described violent incidents in which a sexual or a misogynistic component was introduced, and that LGBT people of color sometimes weren’t sure if anti-queer violence was based solely on their sexuality or whether racism or sexism had also played a role. Meyer observes that given the many differences in how anti-queer violence is experienced, the present media focus on white, middle-class victims greatly oversimplifies and distorts the nature of anti-queer violence. In fact, attempts to reduce anti-queer violence that ignore race, class, and gender run the risk of helping only the most privileged gay subjects.

Many feel that the struggle for gay rights has largely been accomplished and the tide of history has swung in favor of LGBT equality. Violence against Queer People, on the contrary, argues that the lives of many LGBT people—particularly the most vulnerable—have improved very little, if at all, over the past thirty years.

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Wizards vs. Muggles: Essays on Identity and the Harry Potter Universe

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Christopher E. Bell, Christopher E. Bell (Editor)

Harry Potter has given the study of popular culture a unique platform for exploring the nature of human identity. “Potter Studies” is developing into a vibrant interdisciplinary field of scholarship. This collection of new essays examines issues surrounding race, class, gender, sexual orientation and personal virtue, both in the wizarding world and in our own. The contributors discuss an array of meanings and contexts in the Harry Potter universe relating to identity issues, and the ways in which these manifest in fandom cultures and real-world schools and businesses.

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